Here are some common sense advice inspired by our ancient ancestors to be in shape and stay healthy. In a few words: walking, chewing, mint, chatter, novelty and the application of the three-thirds rule.

Live inspired by taking the good ideas of prehistoric men to be in shape © Getty / PeskyMonkey

Practice walking

The brain of prehistoric men has changed from the moment they reached what we are not far from losing today: bipedalism, and walking…
Moving around, exercising 30 minutes a day leads to a 40% decrease in cancers, Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease. The first 20 minutes, we burn sugar. Then we release protective molecules for the body. Often people only practice on weekends. But it’s like brushing your teeth: every day you have to practice a sports activity. That way you have bigger chances to be in shape and stay healthy.

Chew well

Prehistoric men had large jaws to chew consistent foods. Today, we rediscover this power of chewing, to be less hungry and better enjoy food.

Consume mint

Surprisingly, mint plants have been discovered around prehistoric tombs. Our very distant ancestors used it a lot. Today, researchers in neurobiology have shown that this aromatic plant regulates the appetite, and calms the behavior.

Turn towards novelty

Even if we do not know much about our distant ancestors, we know the genes that persisted from prehistory until today, those who protected us. And among the protective factors, we found the search for novelties and sensations.
We know today that what forms new neurons is when we do things we have never done before. So if we are able to get out of our comfort zone to go to novelty we keep in intellectual form, and not only.

Chit-Chat

The chatter: we realised that groups were constituted by chatting. What is gossip? It is transmitting emotions, in a direct way without trying to convince others and listening to them. Rehabilitate our moments of chatter that do more good than we think.

The three-thirds rule

And do not be too wise, do not follow these tips too closely. In everyday life the rule of three-thirds must be applied:
-moments of capitalisation: when we start an activity that we know is succeeding: it is our right to a zone of trust

-moments of consolation: prehistoric men who did not go into depression were those who were totally euphoric during the winter and who were being slaughtered by wild beasts; our ability to retreat when we go wrong is a sign of good health

-moments of novelty.
We’ve also recently shared tips for truly relaxing holidays, have a look at it!

Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post
___