--

--

---

--

Auguste and Louis Lumière
The Lumière (pronounced: [lymjɛːʁ]brothers, Auguste Marie Louis Nicolas [oɡyst maʁi lwi nikɔla] (19 October 1862, BesançonFrance – 10 April 1954, Lyonand Louis Jean [lwi ʒɑ̃] (5 October 1864, BesançonFrance – 6 June 1948, Bandol),[1][2] were the earliest filmmakers in history. (Appropriately, "lumière" translates as "light" in English.)

History

The Lumière brothers were born in BesançonFrance, in 1862 and 1864, and moved to Lyon in 1870, where both attended La Martinierethe largest technical school in Lyon.[3] Their father, Claude-Antoine Lumière (1840–1911), ran a photographic firm and both brothers worked for him: Louis as a physicist and Auguste as a manager. Louis had made some improvements to the still-photograph process, the most notable being the dry-plate process, which was a major step towards moving images.
It was not until their father retired in 1892 that the brothers began to create moving pictures. They patented a number of significant processes leading up to their film camera, most notably film perforations (originally implemented by Emile Reynaud) as a means of advancing the film through the camera and projector. The cinématographe itself was patented on 13 February 1895 and the first footage ever to be recorded using it was recorded on March 19, 1895. This first film shows workers leaving the Lumière factory.

First film screenings

The Lumières held their first private screening of projected motion pictures in 1895.[4] Their first public screening of films at which admission was charged was held on December 28, 1895, at Salon Indien du Grand Café in Paris.[5] This history-making presentation featured ten short films, including their first film, Sortie des Usines Lumière à Lyon (Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory).[6] Each film is 17 meters long, which, when hand cranked through a projector, runs approximately 50 seconds.
It is believed their first film was actually recorded that..CONTINUE READING>>>

Post a Comment

Previous Post Next Post